STUDENTS

Ways We Support Our Students

Camaraderie 1In 2011, UCLA School of Law established the Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy with a $10 million gift from alumnus Lowell Milken. The institute focuses on research in business law and policy in bankruptcy, corporate governance, law and economics, and tax policy and public finance.

Students who wish to focus their schooling in a particular area of business law can earn a certificate of completion with their J.D in any of the following five tracks:

  • Business Law
  • Bankruptcy
  • Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Securities Regulation
  • Taxation

The Master of Laws (LL.M.) advanced law certification program also offers a Business Law and Policy concentration with four separate tracks:

  • Bankruptcy
  • Business Law
  • Securities Regulation
  • Tax

The Business Law and Policy specialization offers an unparalleled opportunity for students who want to be prepared for transactional practice at the highest level. We produce lawyers who combine legal analysis with a thorough understanding of the business client’s goals and challenges and the tools necessary to meet the client’s needs.

Of course, not all business lawyers are transactional lawyers.  Indeed, in today’s legal market many litigators also act as business lawyers and regularly counsel their clients in regard to a myriad of business-related matters.  For these lawyers as well, the training, understanding and experience offered in our Business Law and Policy specialization are extraordinarily valuable and set them apart from their peers.

Business Law and Policy Specialization Requirements

J.D. Application Requirements

LL.M Degree Requirements


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Some of the Ways We Support Our Students:

  • Providing opportunities to collaborate and compete through real-world experiences and diverse extracurricular activities that enrich the law school experience.

    A student favorite, the Lowell Milken Institute Roundtable Lunches give students an opportunity to discuss issues of interest with distinguished visitors, in a small-group, informal setting.

  • Nurturing the next generation of business leaders and scholars through critically needed financial assistance. Scholarships and prizes not only attract the best and brightest students but also keep the promise of access to a world-class legal education alive for people from all walks of life.

    Among the most coveted honors is the Bruce I. Hochman Award for Excellence in the Study of Tax Law which is presented to the student in the graduating class who has demonstrated outstanding proficiency in the field.  The recipient of the $15,000 award is selected by UCLA School of Law tax faculty and is announced at the commencement ceremony in May. The award honors Bruce I. Hochman, who was a member of the first UCLA Law School graduating class of 1952.

  •  Reaching out to numerous student organizations, which promote awareness of issues and opportunities in the business law field. Examples include the Business Law Association, the Law and Economics Society, the Real Estate Law Association, the Tax and Estate Planning Association and the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Clinic.


Programs

Examples of the many opportunities our students have to gain real-world experience through collaboration and competition include:66FD1204

Transactional LawMeet℠
The premier “moot court” experience for students interested in a transactional practice, the National Transactional LawMeet® forms a part of the LawMeet® family of live, interactive, educational competitions designed to give law students hands-on experience in developing and honing transactional lawyering skills.

UCLA School of Law will host the Western Regional LawMeet® convening February 28, 2014. The top team from each side of the negotiation representing each of six Regional Meets will be invited to compete at the National Meet on Thursday and Friday, April 3 and 4, 2014 (location to be determined).

A UCLA team earned the “Best Draft” award at the 2013 Western Regional LawMeet® where our teams were coached by Kirkland & Ellis Partners John Weissenbach and Hamed Meshki and Proskauer Rose Partner Michael Woronoff.


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inth Circuit Bankruptcy Negotiation Competition
In this competition, teams consisting of two to three upper-level students from 12 law schools work through an identical mock bankruptcy case similar to what they will encounter in real-life practice. The competition involves preparation and exchange of written term sheets followed by two rounds of in-person negotiations with the objective to avoid bankruptcy by successfully negotiating with the opposing side. Each team has several months to develop a strategy for the case and then is assigned to represent either the prospective debtor or its unsecured creditors.

Judges provided by the American College of Bankruptcy evaluate teams both on their strategy and how well they interact with other members of their team.

The inaugural competition, co-sponsored by the American College of Bankruptcy and the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, was held at USC on January 26, 2013. UCLA Law‘s team was coached by Peitzman Weg Partner Lawrence Peitzman.


Pircher, Nichols & Meeks Joint Venture Challenge Sponsored by Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy and Ziman Center for Real Estate
Sponsored by the Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy and UCLA’S Ziman Center for Real Estate, this challenge teams up students from UCLA School of Law and UCLA Anderson School of Management to compete in a simulated joint venture real estate deal prepared by Phil Nichols, a founder of Pircher, Nichols & Meeks.

The competition involves teams of three to four students working through both legal and business issues to prepare a professional memorandum answering numerous questions posed by a hypothetical general counsel and investment partner. At the conclusion of the event, two experts in the field present a model answer to the participants.

The winning team in the 2013 Challenge, which shared a $3,000.00 prize, was chosen based on the most comprehensive and correct answers to the questions presented. Read More >>


The UCLA Business Law Breakfast Series

The series provides an informal venue for the discussion of current business law issues with the region’s business and legal communities, including attorneys, accountants, investment bankers and academics.

Previous speakers have included: Neil Barofsky, who served as the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Assets Relief Program (“SIGTARP”) during the financial crisis; Professor Charles M. Elson, a leading expert on executive compensation and corporate governance; former California State Treasurer Phil Angelides; and Kenneth R. Feinberg, special master for TARP Executive Compensation.


Lowell Milken Institute Roundtable Lunches for Students
This roundtable provides an intimate forum in which students can discuss issues of interest with distinguished visitors in a small-group, informal setting. Past Roundtable Lunch speakers include: SEC Commissioner Troy Paredes; UCLA School of Law alumna Kathy Bazoian Phelps, author of The Ponzi Book: A Legal Resource for Unraveling Ponzi Schemes; Neil Barofsky, Special Inspector General for the Troubled Assets Relief Program (“SIGTARP”) during the financial crisis: Haim Bodek, a Managing Principal of Decimus Capital Markets, LLC; and Mary Rose Brusewitz, a UCLA Regents Lecturer and UCLA School of Law alumna who specializes in international transactions.

SIDEBAR:

Student Competitions In Business Law

Transactional LawMeet℠


The premier “moot court” experience for students interested in a transactional practice is designed to give law students hands-on experience in developing and honing transactional lawyering skills. UCLA School of Law will host the Western Regional LawMeet® convening February 28, 2014.

Ninth Circuit Bankruptcy Negotiation Competition

In this competition, teams consisting of two to three upper-level students from 12 law schools work through an identical mock bankruptcy case similar to what they will encounter in real-life practice.

Pircher, Nichols & Meeks Joint Venture Challenge

This challenge teams up students from UCLA School of Law and UCLA Anderson School of Management to compete in a simulated joint venture real estate deal prepared by Phil Nichols, a founder of Pircher, Nichols & Meeks.

Winning Students

The Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy produces some of the nation’s best and brightest future lawyers – evidenced by the many prestigious scholarships and awards bestowed upon our students and graduates each year. Not only does access to these types of honors attract top students, it also keeps the promise of attaining a world-class legal education alive for people from all walks of life.

Among the most coveted honors is the Bruce I. Hochman Award for Excellence in the Study of Tax Law, which is presented annually to the student in the graduating class who has demonstrated outstanding proficiency in the field. The recipient of the $15,000 award is selected by UCLA School of Law tax faculty and is announced at the commencement ceremony each May. Noah Benjamin Metz received the 2013 award; Christopher Hanfling was the 2012 recipient. The award honors Bruce I. Hochman, who was a member of the first UCLA Law School graduating class of 1952.

Thomas A. Kirschbaum Scholarships are awarded to students who demonstrate an interest in and an aptitude for studying tax law. This year, Steve Serna ’14, Ryan McKay Hicks ’15, and Alan Beadle ‘16 were chosen as Kirschbaum Scholarship recipients. The scholarship helps fund the recipients’ education and also connects them to potential mentors in the Los Angeles legal community. Noah Metz ’13 and Ryan J. Shumacher ’14, inaugural recipients of the scholarships in 2012, had the opportunity to meet with the Los Angeles Benefits and Compensation Group (LABCG), a group of 17 leading executive compensation and employee benefits attorneys.

The scholarship was created to honor the life and work of Tom Kirschbaum, ’77, who was widely recognized as one of California’s leading tax, compensation and employee benefits lawyers. Established by Tom’s friends, family and colleagues – including Jim Barrall, who was pivotal in creating and implementing the vision for the scholarship, the award annually recognizes a UCLA Law student or students who embody Tom’s spirit and special qualities – a sharp intellect, sense of humor, passion for life and compassion for others.

David Regan ’13 was awarded the 2012 American Bankruptcy Institute (ABI) Medal of Excellence, which honors top law students who receive the highest grades in bankruptcy courses and who show great promise for a career in bankruptcy practice. Regan’s selection was based on his performance in Professor Kenneth Klee’s bankruptcy course (Law 248) in Fall 2011 and Professor Daniel Bussel’s bankruptcy transactional class (Law 740) in Spring 2012 as well as for his summer work at Klee, Tuchin, Bogdanoff & Stern LLP.

UCLA School of Law student Barry Chang ’14 won the Bronze Medal for the International Insolvency Institute 2013 Prize in International Insolvency Studies. Chang, who is pursuing a joint J.D./M.B.A degree, won the prize for his article “Making a Comedy of Comity: Analyzing In re Vitro’s Implications for Cross-Border Insolvency Law.” Chang’s paper discusses the potential implications of a recent decision in which the Fifth Circuit, in an unprecedented move, refused to recognize in a United States bankruptcy court a Mexican court order confirming a Mexican plan of reorganization. The paper argues that the Fifth Circuit failed to appropriately perform the analysis required in determining whether comity should be extended based on the case law and legislative history of chapter 15. In addition to receiving an honorarium, Chang’s article will be posted on the institute’s website at www.iiiglobal.org and will be considered for publication in the Norton Journal of Bankruptcy Law and Practice.

Michael Behrens ’11 won first prize in the 2011 Tannenwald Writing Competition for his corporate tax paper on Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission entitled "Citizens United, Tax Policy, and Corporate Governance." Behrens, whose paper submission was sponsored by Professor Steven Bank, received a cash prize of $5,000. This writing competition is sponsored by the Theodore Tannenwald, Jr. Foundation for Excellence in Tax Scholarship and The American College of Tax Counsel, and is named after the late Tax Court Judge Theodore Tannenwald, Jr. Law students may submit papers on any federal or state tax-related topic. 

Real Estate Law Clinic

Taught in conjunction with Advanced Real Estate Transactions, the Real Estate Law Clinic is a year-long clinical course offering students practical, hands-on training and experience working on live real estate transactions. Students in the clinic represent nonprofit organizations at various stages in the process of developing affordable housing for low-income residents of Los Angeles. Through both classroom instruction drawing upon practice-oriented readings, case studies and simulated exercises, as well as clinical work representing nonprofit clients, students learn to apply the concepts of Advanced Real Estate Transactions in a real world context and acquire skills required by a modern transactional real estate practice. For detailed information about the course, please visit https://curriculum.law.ucla.edu/Guide/Course/307.

Student Organizations